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Google launches public DNS

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To "make the Internet more quickly," Google has committed itself to a public DNS service to start. Interested parties simply need the IP address of a Google server DN (a sort of address book for name resolution on the Internet down) into the PC or modem settings and then deposit will then be surfing a real treat. Is that really so? 

Caveat: operators of DNS services to make money. This they usually do with the resale of the recorded data servers. Each web page that will be stored in a file and depending on whether one has registered for the service or not, the operator of record according to a profile and then sell it for (more money). If Google is the risk that you can indeed use the DNS without registration, but the data may be linked anyway, because unless you have a Google Account (using Google account). Besides Google, there are still more public DNS service provider. OpenDNS (see also the CNETZ.net ebook about OpenDNS), UltraDNS, OpenNIC and many more. OpenDNS also continue to sell the data, but in an anonymous form. Because the company offers paid premium accounts, one can assume that the whole thing then is really legitimate. A guarantee is not, of course. 


Here is a comparison of some known DN server from the network of Deutsche Telekom AG. Of such comparison is of course not really meaningful, because the values vary greatly depending on time of day. 


A comparison of the network of Deutsche Telekom AG has shown that the German OpenNIC name servers (217.79.186.148) had the best reaction time. In second place, a name server of the telecom 217,237,150,188) (followed by UltraDNS (156.154.70.1), Google (8.8.8.8) and OpenDNS (208.67.222.222) was. OpenDNS DNS servers in the test, therefore the slowest. Nevertheless, one should prefer the OpenDNS DNS servers other name servers. Why? Only this service provides a configuration option. How about all the phishing sites with the blocking? Clicking on OpenDNS is sufficient. Same with pages on topics such as "erotic", "Alcohol and Other Drugs," "weapons", etc. The perfect (free) parental control. To be even more detailed statistics. 

What do you think about Google DNS? Google can get even more control over the Internet? One must never forget that all DNS providers have the opportunity to redirect pages. Thus if you type one google and avails itself of the DNA of XYZ Corp., the company google can simply redirect to a different IP, which does not belong to Google. The normal user does not notice most with nothing, then the page still looks the same. At Google, it is perhaps still acceptable, but it is worse for sites of banks, etc. 

The easiest way is of course the use of the Internet provider’s DNS, but they usually weaken very much. Join one example, a new domain at the NIC, it may take up to 24 hours, until well as the DNA of the Internet dial-up provider has updated itself. OpenDNS offers the possibility of a manual update in under a minute.